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La Crosse and the Civil War Papers: Lucius Fairchild

Location: Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin La Crosse
CITATION: La Crosse and the Civil War Papers. Manuscripts. La Crosse Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

Collection Summary

This exciting collection boasts plenty of documents showing how Civil War soldiers from Wisconsin fought and lived as members of the army. Since these soldiers were all from Wisconsin they fought for the Union side against southern states, or the Confederacy. Both sides had huge armies separated into smaller units. These documents correspond to the smaller units called companies and regiments (see glossary). They give you access to a ton of great details about brave Wisconsinites and fighting in the Civil War.

The documents in this collection can be thought of as falling into two categories: 1) documents tracking individual soldiers and their experiences and 2) descriptions of the combat activities.

There are a range of documents that help bring the characteristics and experiences of individual soldiers to life. Muster in papers, for example, give information about the soldiers when they signed up for the army, like height, hometown, and occupation. Discharge records give reasons why soldiers left the army, often because they were injured or killed. Court cases shed light on the rules soldiers needed to follow and the corresponding punishments. The large numbers of troops and savage combat of this war meant that armies were constantly replacing their soldiers. As a result, muster in and discharges appear in every folder in this collection and provide a great sense of the range of Wisconsinites who fought in the Civil War.

Soldiers’ letters and written histories are much rarer but reveal the important role these Wisconsin units played in combat. There is a letter from one of the North’s most famous and brilliant generals, William T. Sherman. He praises his Wisconsin troops for their success in battle. There is also a written history by Lucius Fairchild. It gives specific details about battles. Fairchild describes the “murderous fire” and “disaster” his regiment encountered in some of the most important battles of the war like Bull Run and Antietam. Amazing stuff!

 

Collection Description

The handwriting in these documents can be challenging – but not impossible – to read. Documents which describe individual soldiers’ identities (like muster in roles and discharge papers) are forms with a lot of filled in blanks, which makes figuring out the handwriting relatively easy, while Fairchild’s documents contain paragraphs of rather sloppy penmanship. I suggest beginning with the documents that describe individual soldiers so that you can get used to this style of cursive before tackling long written paragraphs in Fairchild’s and Sherman’s documents.

This collection consists of one small box with six folders and two larger boxes each containing over ten folders. The folders in the small box correspond with a company, while those in both large boxes focus on the 2nd Wisconsin regiment. This review focuses on just a few of the folders from each box, focusing on soldiers and combat.

 

Box 1

Folder 3 contains William T. Sherman’s letter praising Company I of the 8th Wisconsin regiment for their success in battle (until an illness in camp kept them from entering future combat).
Folder 4 holds Colonel Lucius Fairchild’s written history describing the fighting and marching his regiment endured.

 

Box 2

Folder 4 holds an order given to the whole regiment which describes soldiers’ daily routines like when they woke up, ate and drilled. Very interesting!
File 8 contains lists of clothing which show that many soldiers lacked full sets of clothing!

 

Box 3

Folders 1 and 2 contain the largest group of court cases in the entire collection. These documents reveal the rules soldiers needed to follow and the punishments if they disobeyed them.

 

Reviewed by: Steven Bonin

 

University of Wisconsin-
La Crosse, Murphy Library Area Research Center

 

Location: Murphy Library Special Collections and Area Research Center, La Crosse, Wisconsin.
> CITATION: White, Orris O., Papers, 1919-1962. La Crosse Mss DJ. Wisconsin Historical Society. Housed at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

Collection Summary

Orris “Bob” White, the man behind the collection of the Orris O. White Papers, 1919-1962, lived through two World Wars and the Great Depression. This finding aid will focus only on his experience during and after World War I (1914-1918), because it had a large and long-lasting impact on the rest of White’s life. White was a poet and English professor at La Crosse State Teacher’s College, (which later became UWL), from 1914-1952. His teaching career was interrupted when he left to serve in the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) in France during World War I. The battlefields were not at all what White and his fellow soldiers were expecting. With hardly any training, the AEF was thrust into the first modern war, with machine guns and more advanced weapons than they could have ever imagined.

After the war, White returned home to his job as a professor, but he and many other veterans still could not make sense of their experiences. Because the soldiers felt misunderstood and different, they were called “The Lost Generation.” They carried not only visible scars, but invisible ones as well, like “shell shock,” or what is known today as PTSD. White and many other veterans turned to poetry and creative writing in order to better understand and explain what they’d experienced during the war. Because of this, they became known as soldier-poets. The soldier-poets tell their own personal history of World War I and the aftermath as the world moved into the modern era.

Collection Description

The Orris O. White collection is made up of two boxes. The first box includes various drafts of White’s poems. The second box also contains drafts of poems, as well as some of White’s creative stories and essays. Since there are multiple drafts and copies of each work scattered throughout the collection, this finding aid will indicate only where a particular document first appears. White and his fellow soldier-poets were rather straightforward with their experiences, because they wanted to explain the reality of war and their memories. The poems and stories are fairly easy to read and interpret. His essays are the most straightforward out of all his works. Nearly every document in the collection is typed, except for Box Two, Folder Four. All documents in that folder are handwritten.

A Note on Poetry and the Themes of the World War I Experience and its Aftermath: The soldier-poets aimed to make sense of their own war memories while they showed the public the reality of these experiences. The themes in these poems often vary between bitter feelings of loss felt during and after the war and disconnection to the modern world, to optimistic patriotism and national pride. Works like “War is Hell” and “Cootie” come straight from White’s experiences. However, an important thing to remember is that though these poems hold value as firsthand accounts of memories, soldier-poets often embellished their memories. It wasn’t on purpose, but the modern warfare of World War I rattled many of the soldier-poets. Even with embellishments, White still acts like a historian, writing down his own experiences and his own story through poetry. Poetry may not be a fact-filled history, but it is still a wonderful form of writing history!

This finding aid lists a selection of poem titles that all deal with World War I and its aftermath. There are many more poems included in the collection than are not listed here. Look at the “See Also” section for other topics White writes about.

 

Box One: Poems

Folder Two: Poems
“The World…CALLING or…crying”:  This is poem is a patriotic call to duty. Look for examples of White’s nationalism. He places the U.S. in a superior status above other countries, even during a time of uncertainty.

“The Unknown Soldier (of France)”:  This poem is in memory of Alan Seeger, another famous soldier-poet. It describes Americans getting ready for war, as well as the soldier’s accounts of the French peasants and the countryside. Many soldier-poets would fall in love with this Old World country, which led some to remain in Europe, or to travel often like White did.

“Torch out of Flanders” and “A Stranger”:  These two poems describe the post-war experience. “Torch out of Flanders” tells about the end of the war on Armistice Day (November 11, 1918). “A Stranger” tells about losing a companion in battle, as well as the loss of self.

Folder Seven: Poems
“The Freighter Cook”:  This poem is filled with gloomy emotions from the physical injuries leftover from World War I, and life in the U.S. before the Great Depression.

Folder Nine: Poems
“Then God Dropped for War”:  White writes that “flying (airplanes) was a means of war” and no longer a joy. This poem describes White’s negative response to the war.

“Tomorrow” (to all the Allied Forces):  Contrary to the title, this poem details White’s longing for “yesterday,” or the “good old days.” The poem actually reminds fellow soldiers and veterans “to live, not destroy.” It seems to be a direct response to the violence experienced during World War I, explaining White’s personal reflections and thoughts about his experiences and the aftermath he lived in.

Folder Eleven: Poems
“Silhouettes (of Mississippi Valley)”:  This poem uses images of ghosts, dreams, and nature to explore post-war grief.

 

Box Two: Poems, Prose Sketches, and Essays

Folder One: Essays
“Modern Ancient Mariner”:  This essay shows White’s confidence in America’s “comeback” after the war. He is hopeful for a return to the “good old days.” He explicitly states that his hope for the future lies in the students he teaches every day at La Crosse! (See Box Two: Folder Seven if you want to read more about the classes White taught).

“The Lost Battalion”:  This essay discusses White’s life as a veteran and a professor. He is concerned about the “lost youth,” or the Lost Generation, and states that education, literature, and the arts are the way to help this generation and the United States out of the post-war rut. As a college professor, this perspective makes sense. He puts his hope more in the individual and the arts, rather than industry and development.  Fun Find: This typed out essay has an edit in pencil, adding “world” between the “recent war.” World War One was simply called The Great War while it was actually happening. The “world” wasn’t added until later, and the “one” certainly wasn’t added until after World War Two.

“After That—The Deluge”:  White tries to explain the struggle of his post-war experience. He feels that the United States is caught in a “national game of make-believe,” avoiding the violence and negative aftermath of the war.

“A Reverie (No. 2)”:  In describing violent Midwest blizzards, White mulls over the post-war experience and the odd feeling of “gain out of loss.”

Folder Two: Clipped Essays
“Free”:  White criticizes post-war government in this essay.

“Reflecting on the Atmosphere of AEF”:  This story explains the specific scene of Armistice Day. It describes the French village he stayed in, as well as the French family he lived with during his time at the front. He explains the loss and disbelief he felt, even as messengers declared the Allied victory. Remember soldier-poets embellished their memories even while they tried to show the reality of war.

“War is Hell”:  This seems to be another one of White’s memories. This work tells the story of the soldier’s French friend Pierrot who helped the Allies by discovering and relaying important information. The scene actually takes place after the war was officially over, but raiders still attack the French village overnight.

“Cootie”:  Cootie is a French woman who runs the Alley-way Café, an improvised cafeteria for the Allied troops stationed in her French village. White describes the reactions of the soldiers and Cootie to recent battles.  Fun Find: Before this story, there is a handwritten apology from White. He apologizes for the actions portrayed in the story. White says he was not himself during the “game of war,” and apologizes for this part of himself that committed such violence.

Folder Three: Poems and Prose
“A Bald-Headed Bachelor Looks at Himself in the Mirror”:  This is a fictional story, but it directly references “no man’s land” and trench warfare. This story also explains war injuries, referring to them as “noble wounds.”

Folder Five: Poems
“Bombardier”:  This poem shows White’s support for the air force. It describes the feeling of flight and the heroic deeds of pilots.

Folder Seven: Poems and Prose
“Creed”:  This poem describes the bitter victory many soldiers felt post-war. Although the Allies won the war, the soldier-poets lament the violence they experienced and committed. They fear these memories will haunt them for the rest of their lives.

Reviewed by: Jenae Winter

rubber_mills_shoe_float_1921_specialcollections_murphy_edit

Murphy’s Area Research Center (ARC)

 

Rubber Manufacturing

> Location: Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin La Crosse
> CITATION: see within summary

Collection Summary

This collection was put together for the FFA. It is actually ten different manuscript collections, each with their own title and call number. Together all these different sources tell a story about the LaX Rubber Mills . . . and a lot more!

This collection contains two vertical files on the La Crosse Rubber Mills Co. and LaCrosse Footwear, Inc., six oral history transcripts of people who worked for the La Crosse Rubber Mills Co. and LaCrosse Footwear, Inc., and two booklets published by the Rubber Mills Co. that explain the manufacture of rubber. The two booklets have very unusual names:  “Caoutchouc,” published in 1915 (31-pages), and “Caoutchouc II”  published in 1925 (39-pages).  Don’t be turned off by the name.  These booklets are very interesting and informative.  They are also filled with pictures of the factory and the production process.

The La Crosse Rubber Mills Co. opened in 1896 in La Crosse and moved to Portland, Oregon in 2001. They imported rubber from Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America for making rubber products, mostly footwear. Though they were a small company, they were unique and grew to be one of the largest employers in La Crosse. This collection not only tells the story of a factory, but brings to light ways La Crosse was connected to other areas in the world because of manufacturing. It also tells the story of unions, strikes, and the exploitation of workers in La Crosse.

All the parts in this collection work very well together.  For example, many of the people interviewed in the oral histories talk about the same subject, thus providing a number of viewpoints on the same topic. Likewise, the booklets give background and images to some of the things discussed in the oral histories.  Lastly the vertical files have a wide range of information about everything covered in the both the oral histories and the booklets.  Each part of this collection is strong, but together it’s even stronger!

PLEASE NOTE: The La Crosse Rubber Mills Co. changed its name to LaCrosse Footwear, Inc. in 1986.

 

Vertical Files

CALL NUMBERS/TITLES: La Crosse Businesses Vertical File: LaCrosse Footwear, Inc. La Crosse Businesses Vertical File: La Crosse Rubber Mills

CITATION FOR LACROSSE FOOTWEAR: La Crosse Businesses Vertical File: LaCrosse Footwear, Inc. (1896- present). Special Collections, Murphy Library,University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

CITATION FOR RUBBER MILLS: La Crosse Businesses Vertical File: La Crosse Rubber Mills (1896-present). Special Collections, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

PLEASE NOTE: The citation for documents in the vertical files changes depending on what is used. For example, a newspaper article would be cited differently than a pamphlet. Look at a Chicago Style citation guide or ask a librarian or teacher how to cite your specific source.

Collection Description

The two vertical files are very similar. They have many newspaper articles, pamphlets, programs, newsletters, and advertisements that explain the history and the people working for the Rubber Mills and/or LaCrosse Footwear. Most articles date back to the 1970s, but there are some from before that as well.

One of the oldest newspaper articles is from 1887. It describes the factory when it was quite small and also tells about the imported rubber the factory used. Other articles talk about workers’ strikes, the company’s name change, and the company’s move to Oregon. There is also an issue from a newsletter called “LRM Footwear Footnotes” with an interview of a woman who started working in the Rubber Mills in 1907!

 

Oral History Transcripts

Bill Larkin
Jerry Larkin
Donna Lemke
Richard Morkwed
George Schneider
Herman Tietz

 

CITATIONS FOR ORAL HISTORIES

Bill Larkin, interviewed by Sandra Molzhon, UW-L Oral History Program, UW-L Murphy Library Special Collections and Area Research Center, 8 April 1997.

Jerry Larkin, interviewed by Herbert Tancil, UW-L Oral History Program, UW-L Murphy Library Special Collections and Area Research Center, 22 April 1997.

Donna Lemke, interviewed by Margaret Larson, UW-L Oral History Program, UW-L Murphy Library Special Collections and Area Research Center, 17 November 1994.

Richard Morkwed, interviewed by Sandra Molzhon, UW-L Oral History Program, UW-L Murphy Library Special Collections and Area Research Center, 1 April 1997.

George Schneider, interviewed by Dan Freudenburg, UW-L Oral History Program, UW-L Murphy Library Special Collections and Area Research Center, 19 March 1997.

Herman Tietz, interviewed by Howard Fredericks, UW-L Oral History Program, UW-L Murphy Library Special Collections and Area Research Center, 20 June and 25 July 1972.

Collection Description

The oral histories are interviews with people who worked at the Rubber Mills. Some people worked at the Mills for only a few years, while others worked there their entire life. These interviews cover topics like: unions, working conditions in the factory, pay, child labor, women in the workplace, family relationships, the Depression, the economy, and war. Some interviews focus on the Rubber Mills for only a few pages, while others talk about it for the entire interview.

 

Bill Larkin

Bill Larkin worked as a supervisor for various departments in the Rubber Mills. He worked for the company from 1961 to 1996. The entire interview is about the Rubber Mills.

Pages 1-10 Mr. Larkin talks a lot about work and his work experience.  In particular, he discusses how he got his job at the mill, and his family and co-workers. (Some of his co-workers are also family.)  On pages 8-9 he mentions women in the factory.

Pages 10-13 cover Larkin’s first day on the job and the smell of rubber. Amazing!

Pages 13-21 Larkin addresses wages and the Mill owners.  The Funk family was one of the Mill’s founders and also one of the wealthiest families in La Crosse.   On pages 14-15, he describes working with rubber.

Pages 21-22 discuss unions.

Pages 22-25 Larkin talks about how World War II, the Korean War, Vietnam, and Desert Storm affected the Rubber Mills.

Pages 25-31 Larkin reviews the relationship between the company and the community, the company’s name change, and he gives his opinion on why La Crosse Footwear had the success it did.

 

Jerry Larkin

Jerry Larkin worked as a chief engineer at the plant. He worked there from 1933 to 1976. The entire interview is about the Rubber Mills.

Pages 2-10 hit a wide range of topics, from politics and the Great Depression, to fellow mill workers, wages, and Tuberculosis! These are just a few of the subjects, therefore, for anyone interested in an overview of mill-related topics, these pages may be just the ticket. Also in this section, it is interesting to note that Jerry Larkin talks about his first day on the job.  Bill Larkin’s oral history discusses the same topic, which may make for some enlightening comparisons or connections.

Pages 10-15 talk more about what his job was like, including having to take work home.  In addition, Mr. Larkin discusses what he enjoyed about the job, unions, and how wars affected the company.

Pages 15-20 largely cover the mill’s relationship with La Crosse, the company’s growth, and his brothers’ jobs.  However, on a completely unrelated topic, Larkin also provides insight into college sports!

Pages 20-29 also cover a lot of topics, including Larkin’s boss, Prohibition, changes made at the factory, and the Great Depression.

 

Donna Lemke

Donna Lemke worked on the assembly line and talks about what work was like as a woman. She worked there in the winter of 1947-1948 after graduating high school. Pages 9-16 cover the Rubber Mills.

Pages 9-13 Lemke talks about getting hired and what it was like to work at the mill, including how she dressed.  In particular she discusses some of the dangers related to mill work and her memory of the factory’s smell.  (She specifically notes the smell of the rubber cement.)  Two other topics of note from this section are lay offs and the mill’s production during the wars.

Pages 14-16 discuss workers’ wages and more about getting laid off.

 

Richard Morkwed

Richard Morkwed did not work on the factory floor.  He worked in the billing department, the purchasing department, and later became the Vice President of Distribution. He worked at the company from 1948 to 1992. The entire interview is about the Rubber Mills.

Page 2-11 cover his history with the factory, including his first day on the job.  Mr. Morkwed explains some of the different work duties related to the factory, and just like in Jerry Larkin’s interview, he talks about taking work home.

Pages 11-15 cover a number of different topics, but most notably, workplace atmosphere, layoffs, and the mill’s transfer to a new owner.

Pages 15-20 cover some very interesting topics, including, unions, the Korean War, buying rubber and cotton, the U.S.’s dependence on synthetic rubber during WWII, and company innovation.  This part of the interview pairs nicely with the “Cauotchouc” booklets because they talk about the history of the La Crosse Rubber Mills where the factory got the rubber for making its shoes.  Just a hint, it didn’t come from Wisconsin!

 

George Schneider

George Schneider bought the company in 1982 and became Chairman of the Board. The entire interview is about the company.

Pages 2-6 discuss how Schneider became involved with the company, product changes that happened during his watch, and his philosophy about the the mill.

Pages 6-11 comment on other factories that competed with the La Crosse factory, and innovative changes made.

On pages 11-15 Mr. Schneider talks about hist relationship with workers.  These pages also discuss strikes.  Remember Schneider was the mill’s owner, so his perspective is important to keep in mind.

Pages 15-20 cover the mill’s role in the community, places Schneider traveled on business trips, and his vision for the company.

 

Herman Tietz

Herman Tietz worked in the factory from 1906 to 1908 making shoes. Only pages 31-38 cover the Rubber Mills.  The rest of the interview is about other topics.

On pages 31-33 Mr. Tietz describes what the Rubber Mills looked like way back in 1903.  He talks about what his job was like, and also his wages.

Pages 33-36 covers how shoes were made, and again, the smell of the rubber is brought up.  (See also Donna Lemke and Bill Larkin.)  Mr. Tietz goes further on this subject and describes the lack of ventilation in the factory.

Pages 36-38 discuss unions, working conditions,and his brother’s fallout with management.

 

Booklets

CALL NUMBERS/TITLES: Cauotchouc: The Manufacture of Rubber Footwear, An Illustrated Story of Rubber from its growth to the finished Product,” (1915)
(F589.L1626 L3754 1915)

“Cauotchouc II: The Manufacture of Rubber Footwear, An Illustrated Story of Rubber from its growth to the finished Product,” (1925)
(F589.L1626 L3754 1925)

PLEASE NOTE: “Cauotchouc II” is also available as a digital resource at: http://murphylibrary.uwlax.edu/digital/lacrosse/LaxFootwearCatalog1925/01.htm.

CITATION FOR BOOKLETS

La Crosse Rubber Mills Company. “Caoutchouc: The Manufacture of Rubber Footwear: An Illustrated Story of Rubber from its Growth to the Finished Product.” La Crosse, WI: La Crosse Rubber Mills Company, 1915.

La Crosse Rubber Mills Company. “Caoutchouc II: The Manufacture of Rubber Footwear: An Illustrated Story of Rubber from its Growth to the Finished Product.” La Crosse, WI: La Crosse Rubber Mills Company, 1925.

Collection Description

The two booklets “Caoutchouc” (1915) and “Caoutchouc II” (1925) are very similar. Indeed, the second one is just an updated version of the first. Both explain where the factory’s rubber came from, how it was produced, and the products manufactured. Also, both have pictures to go with the text.  Reading these booklets will help establish the context needed to better understand the La Crosse Rubber Mills.

PLEASE NOTE: The Rubber Mills published these booklets for their own purposes, and can be considered corporate propaganda. Think about this while reading the words and looking at the pictures too.

“Caoutchouc: The Manufacture of Rubber Footwear, An Illustrated Story of Rubber from its growth to the finished Product,” (1915) is 31-pages long.

Pages 3-10 go through the history of rubber, where it came from, and how rubber manufacturing was invented. These pages are very interesting because they show that over 100 years ago La Crosse had connections with places you may have never thought possible.

Pages 11-26 discuss rubber manufacturing. These pages also have many photographs of workers in the factory, which along with the text, provides a kind of virtual tour of the rubber mills!

Pages 27-29 tour the administrative offices and give a conclusion to the booklet.

Pages 30-31 has pictures of different shoe styles made by the company.

“Cauotchouc II: The Manufacture of Rubber Footwear, An Illustrated Story of Rubber from its growth to the finished Product,” (1925) is 39-pages long. It is longer than the first one because it has more information and a more complete tour of the factory buildings with additional pictures. Inside the front cover is also a flyer stating the purpose of the publication of this booklet.

Pages 3-5 give a history of rubber and where rubber came from.  (Remember that this booklet is very similar to the first!)

Pages 6-7 explains the “vulcanization” of rubber.

Pages 8-10 discuss where rubber comes from. In particular, this book looks at rubber from wild rubber trees vs. plantations.

Pages 11-26 covers rubber manufacturing and footwear production. There are many photos and it feels like a tour through the factory.

Pages 27-30 give a brief history of the Rubber Mills, its founders, and company growth. There are also pictures of the founders and illustrations showing factory changes over the years.

Pages 31-34 give a description of the administrative offices with photos.

Page 35 shows product distribution throughout the world.

Pages 36-39 has pictures of different styles of shoes made by the company and gives a conclusion to the booklet.

 

Reviewed by: Jennifer DeRocher

wwii_women_edit

Murphy’s Area Research Center (ARC)

 

> Location: Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin La Crosse
> CITATION: Wisconsin Extension Homemakers Council Oral History Project: The Impact of Her Spirit. Manuscripts. La Crosse Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin – La Crosse.

Collection Summary

The real title of this collection is the Wisconsin Extension Homemakers Council (WEHC). From 1920-1960 the WEHC was a volunteer organization for women that organized social, educational, and community development activities.  The homemakers held frequent meetings, cooking lessons, and a range of other volunteer activities. They greatly valued volunteerism and education. These women worked with other organizations, such as the YMCA and the Children’s Home in La Crosse, and supported each other during the Great Depression and World War II by learning how to ration items and create budgets. This collection tells the stories of thirteen women – members of the WEHC –  who lived through the Great Depression, World War II, and the changing roles of women in society. This box includes women from places such as Onalaska, Holmen, and Sparta.

This is a primary source collection of oral history interviews of local women who were members of the WEHC. They are separated into fourteen folders. Each folder includes one interview of a Wisconsin woman. All of the interviews are typed, double spaced, and have very wide margins. Easy reading!  The interviews vary in length, but none are very long. The collection also includes two small books that contain pictures and recipes.

Collection Description

Folders

Folder 1 is the only folder that does not include an interview. This folder has five documents, including a pamphlet with pictures of the councils, a description of the WEHC, a guide that lists questions used in the interviews, an advertisement for the WEHC, and a project from one of the homemakers. This project is a mini-drama written by Betty Epstein, whose interview is found in Folder 5.

Folder 2 is the account of Helen Basset, a farmer’s wife. Basset described her community work with the council. For example, Basset was part of the Indian Mission. The mission worked to dress Native American children in “clean and suitable” clothing. This interview is 14 pages.

Folder 3 describes the life of Joanne Dach from Viroqua, Wisconsin.  Dach described charities that her chapter of the WEHC took part in. For example, she discussed food pantry donations and raising money for Haiti. Dach also described the challenges faced by women who attended college and worked full time jobs. This interview is 12 pages.

Folder 4 includes the story of Dott Dobbs, from Ontario, Wisconsin. Alongside her farm duties, Dobbs described the volunteer work and roles of the WEHC. The council assisted with the local 4-H club and supported community members in need. For example, her council provided aid to families that were impacted by house fires and unexpected deaths. This interview is 12 pages.

Folder 5 presents the story of Elisabeth (Betty) Epstein, from Jackson County. Unlike the other women in this collection, Epstein had a college degree. She described her work in the offices of army camps during World War II, and like Joanne Dach (folder 3), Epstein discussed gender roles. At one point Epstein described her community as a “man’s world” based on the opposition her council faced over railroad crossings. This interview is 12 pages.

Folder 6 is the narrative of Marion Fauska from Onalaska, Wisconsin. Fauska described her educational experiences attending a six week course in order to become a teacher. This folder also includes discussion about the Great Depression and World War II. Fauska provides the perspective of a young bride who could not afford a honeymoon and how she was encouraged to work due to a shortage of teachers during the war. This interview is 35 pages.

Folder 7 describes the life of Mae Flaig from Sparta, Wisconsin. She was part of the WEHC, a Leadership Development Committee, and the 4-H Club. Flaig experienced the economic challenges and the shifting gender roles of women during the Great Depression and World War II. For example, Flaig noted that women became increasingly interested in political activity. This interview is 59 pages.

Folder 8 contains the interview of Leila Halverson, a farmer from Holmen, Wisconsin. She discussed lessons given by the Homemakers Association. These lessons included dressmaking and food preservation. Halverson also described food substitutes and how even in birthday cakes sugar had to be rationed during World War II. This interview is 5 pages.

Folder 9 holds the account of Dolores Kenyon, from Sparta, Wisconsin. After her marriage in 1943, Kenyon’s husband left to fight in World War II. She described women’s shifting roles, such as non-domestic work and financial planning.  Kenyon was a volunteer with 4-H and the “Association for Retarded Citizens” (people with cognitive needs) in 1958.  Small portions of this interview are hand written. This interview is 16 pages.

Folder 10 holds the interview of Effie Knudson, from West Salem, Wisconsin. Knudson was involved with the YMCA and the Children’s Home in La Crosse.  Knudson described the Great Depression in an account about rationing sugar. She also discussed World War II and Victory Gardens. This interview is 16 pages.

Folder 11 contains the story of Josephine Sullivan Nixon. Nixon’s father served in the Civil War between 1863 and 1865, being discharged after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated. The interview also gives an account of what life was like during the Great Depression, including meat rationing and flour substitutes. This interview is 31 pages.

Folder 12 belongs to Alice Nuttleman from Onalaska, Wisconsin. Nuttleman described the lessons that the council taught, such as bread making and sewing. She also described growing gardens, picking berries, and rationing sugar during the Great Depression. This interview is 12 pages.

Folder 13 describes the life of Margaret O’Rourke, a mother of twelve from Monroe, Wisconsin. She discussed sugar stamps, gas stamps and the difficulty of getting new tires during World War II. O’Rourke also described the Women’s Movement and gender roles during the war. For example, O’Rourke stated that men took part in more domestic duties in comparison to previous years. This interview is thirty 9 pages.

Folder 14 contains an interview from Elsie Roberts, who discussed the Great Depression. Roberts described a shortage of money and food stamps. This interview is 14 pages.

 

Reviewed by: Krystle Thomas

trowbridge_1930_special_collections_murphy_edit

Murphy’s Area Research Center (ARC)

 

> Location: Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin La Crosse
> CITATION: Trowbridge, Myrtle.  Manuscripts.  La Crosse Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

Collection Summary

Miss Myrtle Trowbridge was a history professor at the La Crosse State Teachers College (LSTC), or what we know today as the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. During World War II, Miss Trowbridge sent many letters and gifts to former LSTC students who were serving.  This collection includes the men’s letters to Miss Trowbridge written from battlefields in Europe, the Pacific, and bases throughout the U.S. Some letters were written after WWII, during U.S. military involvement in Korea and the Pacific Islands during the 1950s.  Most of these letters show that the men are in good spirits, however homesickness is not uncommon! The letters are organized by date and almost entirely handwritten in cursive, although some are typed. Sometimes a letter’s location may not be clear due to censorship.  For example, many list their location as “Somewhere in France.”

Collection Description

This collection consists of one box, with 9 folders organized by date. There almost 500 letters total! Most of the letters are from soldiers and only about 5 are from Dr. Trowbridge.  Also included in the collection is an index of names, dates, locations, and letter summaries.  The index is available online through the complete finding aid. It provides another way to prepare before visiting the ARC.  Take note however, reading a letter summary is not the same as reading the real letter.  It would not be correct to cite the summary as a primary source document.

 

Folder 1

Folder 1 contains letters from late 1941 and all of 1942. Most of the letters are from former students who are in basic training, and so are very optimistic about the war. For example, a letter from LeRoy Holm, who was at a training base in Georgia, stated that training was boring and that he couldn’t wait to be shipped overseas to fight the Germans.

 

Folder 2

Folder 2 contains letters from January to June 1943. In these letters many of Professor Trowbridge’s former students ask her about events back home and how the University is doing. This shows that there is quite a bit of homesickness among the soldiers. However, attitudes towards the war remain high. Also in the letters, many of the soldiers stress how important it is to write to a soldier. For example, after Private J.E. Allen of the United States Marine Corps got done with a grueling 4-month battle on a small Pacific island called Guadalcanal, he wrote, “I don’t think people in civilian life know the importance of writing to fellas in the service. It gives us all hope.” He goes on to write how he is a new man after that battle and he doesn’t think he will ever be the same.

 

Folder 3

Folder 3 contains letters from July through December 1943. Homesickness is a common theme with the former students. One of the students, LeRoy Holm, has just finished artillery school and is in New York City waiting to be deployed across the Atlantic. He stressed his concerns about not being home to help his sister start her college career and asks Miss Trowbridge to help her. On the other side of the United States, James F. Quinn of the United States Naval Seventh Amphibious Force is being shipped to Australia. He misses home cooked meals like the steak dinner Dr. Trowbridge made for him and a few of his friends before he left for basic training. His ship’s name is blacked out on the letter. This is an example of the military censorship going on during the war.

 

Folder 4

Folder 4 contains letters from January to June 1944. Miss Trowbridge fell ill over the winter of 1943-44 and many of her students show concern with her health and are happy to hear she is better. The war is really heating up at this time and many letters talk about the rising casualty rate. Corporal Ole Owens of the Office of Strategic Services in London, England writes about a friend shot down over occupied Europe and captured by the Germans. Owen is aware of the number of war casualties, and he believes that the general public is too optimistic about the war.

 

Folder 5

Folder 5 contains letters from July through September 1944.  There’s a lot going on in this folder.  The men write about their education in the service, their efforts trying to keep up with developments back in La Crosse, as well as the devastation of war. Many men are optimistic that the war will end soon because the “boys” in Europe and the Pacific are “doing the job.”  Meanwhile, soldiers stationed in the U.S. are eager to join the front lines. As a whole, the letters in this folder do a great job showing the range of experiences and points of view that existed during WWII.

 

Folder 6

Folder 6 contains letters from October through December 1944.  Some of the men talk about the upcoming Presidential election between Franklin D. Roosevelt and Thomas E. Dewey. They discuss the election’s impact on the war, as well as their attitudes towards the British and the Russians.  The upcoming holidays put a damper on the soldiers. The men in the Pacific complain of the heat and tell Miss Trowbridge how much they miss snow. Bill Keppel, a former LSTC student, is missing. Many of the men have feelings of homesickness.

 

Folder 7

Folder 7 contains letters from January through April 1945. In these letters there is a sense of confidence that Germany will fall soon, and the men in Europe look forward to “meeting” the Russians in Germany.  (Because the Russians invaded from one side, and the Americans from the other, meeting would signify that the allies had taken over all of Germany.)  However, there are concerns that the death of President Roosevelt will delay peace talks. The letters also discuss a memorial for La Crosse’s fallen soldiers back home.  One man even proposes the idea of building a football stadium with a memorial to honor the fallen.  (In 1948, Veterans Memorial Stadium was built, and it still stands today on campus!)

 

Folder 8

Folder 8 contains letters from May through December 1945.  As the war comes to an end censorship is reduced, and the men write more detailed letters about their location and past involvement in the war.  One man talks about being one of the first of the allies to reach Nanking, China, while just eight years earlier he was in Miss Trowbridge’s class learning about the Nanking Massacre.  Many men are still overseas but no longer in combat.  They express their desire to return home, although some are enjoying the “extended vacation at the government expense.” Some of the letters show a nervous optimism and uncertainty about their return.  After the war, many men talk about returning to college on the GI Bill.

 

Folder 9 

Folder 9 contains a mix of letters from the late 1940s-early 1950s, during when the US enters the Korean Conflict.  Also included in this folder are undated letters and three letters from Miss Trowbridge herself.

 

Reviewed by: Eric Graf and William Weidert

 

uwl_protest_vietnam_war_racquet_1970_specialcollections_murphy_edit

Murphy’s Area Research Center (ARC)

 

> Location: Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin La Crosse
> CITATION: UW-L Vertical File: Students –Demonstrations #1 (1966-2010). Special Collections and Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.
UW-L Vertical File: Students – Demonstrations #2 (1966-1972). Special Collections and  Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.
UW-L Vertical File: Students – Demonstrations #3 (1966-2010). Special Collections and Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse.

Collection Summary

The real name of this collection is Demonstrations, or, Student Demonstrations.  It contains three vertical files: “Demonstrations #1,” “Demonstrations #2 (1966-1972),” and “Demonstrations #3.” The files are filled with newspaper articles, government documents, university documents, newsletters, student event flyers, student protest signs, and more. There is no set organization for any folder, and all of the files cover La Crosse and other campuses. Don’t be fooled by the label!

The documents in each folder have to do with student protests mostly during the 1960s and 1970s, although there are also some articles from the 1990s and 2000s. These protests were generally about the Vietnam War, the Iraq War, the environment, and other issues important to students.

The documents show how the 1960s and 1970s were a time of conflict between college students and the government, as well as college students and La Crosse community members. The language used is very interesting and informative. For example, in a number of the government documents, college students are described as needing haircuts, baths, clean clothes, and more intelligence. There are many La Crosse Tribune articles that report student actions negatively.

PLEASE NOTE: In many of the articles from the 1960s and 1970s, UW-La Crosse was called Wisconsin State University-La Crosse (WSU) or La Crosse University (LCU).

Collection Description

PLEASE NOTE: The citation for each document in the vertical file depends on the type of document it is. For example, a newspaper article would be cited differently than a memo or a protest sign. Go to the Chicago Manual of Style, or ask a librarian or teacher for help.

 

DEMONSTRATIONS #1

CALL NUMBER/TITLE: UW-L Vertical Files – Students – Demonstrations

Demonstrations File #1 has documents that cover 1966-2009. There are newspaper articles about bomb threats on the La Crosse campus, student protests against the Vietnam War and U.S involvement in Cambodia, reaction to student protests, rallies against coal burning, protests against U.S. involvement in Iraq, use of tear gas and force on student protestors, and violence against women. This file also contains UWL student-made flyers, and  documents between the university and the government in which officials discuss what to do about campus demonstrations and bomb threats.

 

DEMONSTRATIONS #2

CALL NUMBER/TITLE: UW-L Vertical Files – Students – Demonstrations

Demonstrations File #2 is very similar to File #1 except it’s thicker.  This file has mostly government reports that discuss problems with student protests in La Crosse, Wisconsin, and the U.S. There are also newspaper articles specifically about La Crosse University students causing trouble. There are a few articles from UW-Madison’s liberal newspaper The Daily Cardinal about student protests. There is a court document on an incident that took place at UW-Oshkosh involving the Black Student Union’s civil rights protests. Some students were suspended for disruption and destruction of property.

 

DEMONSTRATIONS #3

CALL NUMBER/TITLE: UW-L Vertical Files – Students – Demonstrations

Demonstrations File #3 is similar to the other two files, however it has mostly student-made flyers that announce demonstration events on La Crosse’s campus. There are also many documents and flyers that mention the draft and the Vietnam War, as well as anti-war happenings at Kent State (in Ohio) and Berkeley (in California).

 

Reviewed by: Jennifer DeRocher

all_american_girls

www.aagpbl.org/index.cfm/teams

 

> Location: Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin La Crosse
> CITATION: Ellen (Ahrndt) Proefrock, interviewed by Clement C. GrawOzburn, La Crosse Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin La Crosse, January 19, 2004.

Ruth (Ries) Zillmer, interviewed by Charles Lee, La Crosse Area Research Center, Murphy Library, University of Wisconsin La Crosse, January 8, 2004.

Collection Summary

From 1943-1954 America had its first women’s professional baseball league, the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). Chicago Cubs owner Philip K. Wrigley – yes, the chewing gum guy – created the league to keep the American pastime alive throughout WWII when a majority of the top male baseball players joined the war effort to serve their country. The first four teams formed in 1943 with 64 women, but eventually that number would grow to many more teams and over 550 female players!

This collection includes oral history interviews of two women who played in the AAGPBL, Ellen (Ahrndt) Proefrock and Ruth (Ries) Zillmer. Oral histories are recorded interviews with people who have personal knowledge of past events. In these interviews the former players cover topics related to their personal life as well as what life was like as a player in the league. Both women answer questions about subjects like uniforms, social expectations, tryouts, practice, and life on the road. They also address issues related to WWII such as the role of women in the workforce, gender roles, and public opinion of women’s sports during this time.

Collection Description

The histories are .wav format on a CD and can be listened to with any audio program such as iTunes or Windows Media Player. The quality is good so you can understand everything being said, but there is not a transcript so you must take your own notes for direct quotes. Also, the interviews are not very long so they are easy to listen to in their entirety, but if you’d like, you can use the times provided below to easily jump to a section you’re most interested in.

 

Ellen (Ahrndt) Proefrock

Ellen (Ahrndt) Proefrock played second base for the South Bend Blue Sox in 1944. This interview talks about her experience in the league.

Personal History (1:13-9:34) – In this section learn about Ellen’s life on the family farm and her early years playing baseball. At one point she recalls how her dad built a baseball field on their farm and all the community kids would come there to play.

Life playing in the All American Girls Professional Baseball League (9:34-29:55) – During this part of the interview Ellen talks about her daily life while a part of the league. She discusses the players’ uniforms – they wore skirts – and attending “Charm School” as a part of her baseball training. Ellen also talks about practice, player salaries, bus trips, and having to live with another family during the baseball season.

Opinions (29:55-27:15) – Near the end of WWII the men started to come back and so many of the “girl” teams were disbanded. In this section Ellen gives her opinions of the legacy and the end of the AAGPBL.

WWII (37:15-44:51) – During the war women took on many new gender roles, including playing baseball. In this part of the interview Ellen talks about women in the workforce, why the AAGPBL was formed and women’s liberation after the war.

Life after the AAGPBL (44:51-58:00) – In this section Ellen talks about being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, and the 1992 movie A League of Their Own. Ellen talks about how both these events really put the AAGPBL on the map.

Total Time = 58 minutes

Ruth (Ries) Zillmer

Ruth (Ries) Zillmer was a pitcher for the Rockford Peaches from 1951-1952. In this interview she recalls what life was like playing in the All American Girls Professional Baseball League.

Personal History (00:40-8:47)  – Ruth was born in Illinois before moving to a farm in Wearworth, Wisconsin, when she was 12 years old. In this section Ruth talks about growing up playing catch with her brother, and on various country school teams. Ruth played on a traveling team organized by the girls at her high school!

Life playing in the AAGPBL (8:47-22:31) – Ruth was a pitcher for the Rockford Peaches.  In this section she talks about the team manager, William Allington, and learning how to properly slide into base while wearing a skirt.  Ruth also discusses social expectations, uniforms, and tryouts.

WWII (22:31-31:27) – The 1940s was the time that “Rosie the Riveter” was telling women that they were needed in factories but after the war women were expected to return to their traditional gender roles in the home. In this section of the interview Ruth talks about the difference between the early years of the war and league and the later years when she played. She also talks about what girl’s athletics were like during this time including basketball, which was played only half court and with no dribbling.

Life after the AAGPBL (31:27-48:18) – The league officially ended in 1954 after only 6 teams remained. In this part Ruth talks about returning to school, getting married, and her continued interest and involvement in baseball. During this last section Ruth also talks about the Hall of Fame Induction, player reunions, and the legacy of the league.

Total Time = 48 minutes

Link

http://sites.google.com/a/uwlax.edu/friendly-finding-aid/AAGPBL.html

 

Reviewed by: Megan Hackbarth